Cricket

A Twitter Thread About India’s Outgoing Bowling Coach Bharat Arun Sums Up India’s Success In Overseas

The 2021 T20 World Cup marked the end of an era for a few members of the Indian backroom staff. Ravi Shastri, R Sridhar and Bharat Arun all recently bid adieu to their roles. Under them, although there was not an ICC Trophy to show, India did well across conditions and formats. In this article, we take a look at a Twitter thread about India’s outgoing bowling coach Bharat Arun, which sums up India’s recent overseas success.

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The end of an era in Indian cricket

In 2017, when Ravi Shastri was appointed as the Head Coach of Team India, he wanted one man to be his side. Shastri went to the extent of giving up the opportunity to coach India if he did not have Bharat Arun in his team.

There is a reason why Bharat Arun is regarded highly in the Indian cricket circles. He played very few games for the country, but the 58-year-old is known to have a keen eye for bowling talent. Bharat is also exceptional when it comes to coaching the bowlers and also training the bowling coaches. He has done that while he was in NCA and continued when he was part of Team India.

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A thread about India’s outgoing bowling coach Bharat Arun

One of the hallmarks of Shastri’s era is the performance of Indian bowlers in overseas conditions. In the past, the Indian pacers struggled to collect 20 wickets in the SENA nations. However, in recent years, the pace bowling unit has been doing that consistently.

It was a process that was set up by Bharat Arun and co. that resulted in this success. As explained in a thread by a Twitter user, along with Shastri, Arun had a clear vision of the output. Apart from building the pace attack, he also knew the importance of depth and variety. All of this helped India to win the Australia series despite the absence of the senior pacers. The success of the likes of Mohammed Shami, Jasprit Bumrah and Mohammed Siraj is all down to the expertise of Bharat Arun. The Twitter thread explains this in a detailed way:

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